GI Joe and Average Joe Fallacies (Science of Well-being Course Week 2)

The videos and content in Week 2 of the  Science of Well-being course mostly focused on dispelling misconceptions we have about happiness. Professor Laurie Santos talked a lot about, and referenced studies to back her point, how a lot of things we perceive will make us happy, or sad should we not get it, don’t have nearly the impact we think they have. That’s because our intuition for predicting happiness is terrible! Professor Santos didn’t frame it in the following way, but it seemed to me our intuition for what would make us happy is very much based in the amygdala that’s the emotional centre, and reptilian part, of our brain that’s old, more animal-like and limited. Emotional intelligence, as a concept, is the ability to control this amygdata with the rest, and more rational part, of the brain, the part that knows waiting 20 minutes for 2 marshmallows instead of taking 1 now will bring you greater benefits when you are as young as 4 years old. That was the key to the Stanford Marshmallow Experiment that showed having delayed gratification as a trait in a 4 year old who first starts to think, is a better predictor of success in life compared to any other tests like SAT scores, education attainment, BMI, etc. That animal instinct suggesting what might make us happy is a very simple and basic form of processing that gets predicting happiness, and especially lasting happiness, all wrong.

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How I Will Examine my 23andMe Genotyping Results, and How I Will Share Them

From my experience with 23andMe’s genotyping service, when results were ready, I got 254 reports all at once, and they didn’t even include much of the ancestry reports! The reports are listed at the end, and were in groupings of:

  • Health risks (120)
  • Drug response (24)
  • Inherited conditions (50)
  • Traits (60)
  • 3 special reports needing individual approval among above groupings
  • 3 health tools to assess some features about you

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My 41 Life Philosophies (So Far)

I have many life philosophies by which I live. By life philosophies, I mean principles and attitudes I really live by, not just nod when I hear them in the form of a good quote or speech. I have never kept record of these life philosophies, but I thought I’d take some time to write some down now to see if I had one for every year I’ve lived. Why one per year lived? Because I’ve long thought that if I could learn something valuable enough from life each year to turn it into a life philosophy, a life outlook and behavioral change for the rest of my life, it’d have been a good year for wisdom.

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