Impact of Breathing Your Own Air When Wearing COVID-19 Mask, an Experiment Showing

Important: This is NOT an anti-masking post. It is a scientific experiment to show facts regarding what a COVID-19 mask wearer might have to deal with in partly breathing their own breath back in with every breath, so the wearer can be informed and decide when they would want to do it and not within the law, not against the law. The decision is not to obey or disobey the law, but rather to obey the law and do something requiring mask wearing, or abstain from it because the impact isn’t worth the activity. For example, go shopping in a mall with a mask (required where I am), or not and do online shopping or window shopping from the street, NOT go shopping in a mall without a mask.

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Nova Scotia’s CoViD-19 Story… in Verse

There once was a land called Nova Scotia –
Which’s Premier asked the people not to roam –
In pandemic times of new corona –
This is their tale to #staytheblazeshome!

To prevent the spread of CoViD-19 –
They had to stay inside, with some, alone –
Until it was gone or came a vaccine –
They all would have to #staytheblazeshome!

They could still explore the world, see others –
Through Firefox, Facetime, Facebook, Skype, Edge, Chrome –
Each one on their own, or all together –
Connect with tech and #staytheblazeshome!

There were lots of other things to do, though –
If folks did not have internet or phones –
Arts, crafts, books, games, writing, music, puzzles –
So much to help them #staytheblazeshome!

Now, of course, they had to go out sometime –
But far too oft, and always with their phones –
Through which Google tracked them day and night time –
To show they did not #staytheblazeshome!

When the Premier saw this, he was livid –
He got on TV, his mouth frothed with foam –
Scolded those ignoring laws on CoViD –
And told them all to #staytheblazeshome!

Right away, the message resonated –
The world made memes, beers, songs, shirts, all things known –
Ev’ry thing with what the Premier stated –
His catchphrase hashtagged, #staytheblazeshome!

But unlike the virus that went viral –
His scolding’s biggest impact was in tone –
Worse and worse, the situation spiraled –
Folks yelled, but did not #staytheblazeshome!

So he sent police to ticket people –
For being where they’re not allowed to roam –
Or too close in public, or too social –
When they know well to #staytheblazeshome!

This worked well, and things reopened slowly –
Each step with rules, enough to make a tome –
To avoid more peaks and waves that’d only –
Return them all to #staytheblazeshome!

So did Nova Scotians follow plenty –
Enough to rid of CoVidD from their home?
Will there be a Tales from CoViD 20?
One called You Did Not #staytheblazeshome!

Meh! For now, heed Nova Scotia’s screw-up –
As detailed in this cautionary poem –
To diminish such pandemics’ wallop –
Right from the start, ye #staytheblazeshome!

An Interactive Analysis Suite for Google COVID-19 Mobility Data

I recently completed an interactive analysis suite for Google’s COVID-19 mobility data, to let me (and others) do all kinds of comparisons one simply cannot get close to with those static Google mobility data reports! Unfortunately, you will have to go to the Tableau public site, the platform on which I built it, to see and use it because I cannot embed webpages with JavaScript in the WordPress platform this blog is built on.

The Tableau “viz” analysis suite lets you do things like compare for any time period for which Google gave daily data, and even between two time periods. You can also compare any number of countries, regions, even US counties, with data filters. You can compare habits over the days of the week, or see what mobility behaviors people changed (or didn’t, on individual days in a range days). There are “fair expectations” set for each metric based on average to slightly above performance shown to be attainable over a 6 week period, to give further context to the numbers. There is a population filter to compare countries in select ranges of populations. Finally, there are ranks so you don’t have to memorize any numbers in comparing performance in different places and/or over different times. Lots of stuff you can do all kinds of analytics with, draw conclusions about (though be careful on assumptions), and such!

The Tableau viz will be updated roughly once a week, when Google puts out the latest data set. It doesn’t seem they’ll be too consistent with when they do that, but only varying between Thursday and Friday so far. In that Tableau viz is:

  • A table of content tab (at top of view) outlining what is in each tab;
  • A map of the world showing how countries compare for each of the 6 metrics;
  • Continental maps showing regional breakdowns in each country on the continent (where there is data);
  • Even a US county breakdown map;
  • Graphs showing ranks of countries and regions (US counties were too spotty with incomplete data for me to care and give it its own comparison dashboard);
  • Graphs showing select regions against others, allowing comparisons between countries and smaller regions like states and provinces, for example;
  • Graphs showing results over time;
  • Bundled sets of charts in logical order to produce what would be a good briefing report, without text that someone could write for their region/s if they wanted to; and
  • Lots more!

Please click on the link if you want to test out the analytical suite I built. It’s free! No ads or anything! 🙂

Thanks!