One Month Resolutions Check In (2021)

https://digitalcitizen.ca/category/resolutions/

January is over, and all of my resolutions for 2021 are still in tact. I expect them to be all year if my few decades of such tracking are any indication of how I perform in that regard. I still haven’t documented them all on this blog, with all the proper writing out of methodologies as per my Resolutions Planner that I had shared a month ago or so. However, I have all the elements worked out in my mind, and all the tracking information in my Google Sheets Daily Activities Tracker that I had also shared. So let’s have a look to see how I’m doing.

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My Food Budget Resolution

In 2009, I was in a good full time job working downtown, near where all kinds of food establishments were. That included a food court accessible by a tunnel from the building in which I worked, being in cold and stormy Canada during winter, to give me easy access to work lunch year round. It made it all too easy to buy lunch every day and never having to think about making lunch the evening before. After all, what was I earning a decent living for if not to enjoy life? And this was no splurge. There was a lot of fast food from that food court, I regret to admit. It was just the free time from cooking that motivated me not to cook for lunch, though the fact that a regular meal also got me two fast food meals, and not one that seemed much healthier. That perception, though, was probably a misperception, in part, from my choice not to go for vegan salads or other healthier meals that didn’t provide caloric needs for my marathon training.

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My Tangible Resolutions Checklist

I have completed compiling my resolutions list for myself, though it will be a few more days by the time I get them transferred to here for documentation. That’s because I did them by hand like I said should be done in the Resolutions Planner I created and shared. Looking at my list, most are habit oriented, like sleeping so much so often (that is a challenge for the active me), intermittent fasting, spending frequency, and so on. They don’t really yield a tangible outcome on their own, but rather support one, if at all. While that may be great, to have a healthy me, money in the bank, and so on, the results aren’t directly the sole outcomes of these efforts, and even how much for attribution would be debatable. Fear not, no, fret not, no frown not? I still have some tangible outcomes on my resolutions list, and they are like checklist style items that many resolutions are like for most people.

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The Bling Days Resolution

In 2019, and most years prior to that, I spent money on about 75% of days, albeit not much on most occasions. In 2020, to cut down on those small purchases, I committed to spending money on fewer days than I did not money, or spending money on less than 50% of days during the year. But then came this COVID-19 thing, a lockdown with it, some excellent self-control, and I was hitting early targets of spending money on just 10% of days at one point in the spring! With that incredible burst out of the gates, I tried to balance enjoyment of life while not spending, and ended up spending money on 18.4% of days. That’s doesn’t include rent and automatic bill deductions for convenience, but it’s only a technicality because I could have paid them any number of days where I spent money, ahead of time if need be, but just didn’t for the convenience of saving time.

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An Intermittent (Fasting) Resolution

Intermittent fasting is the practice of regularly consuming all your daily food and drink, except for water (drink as needed), within an 8 hour period such that on a 24 hour cycle, you fast for 16 hours. Regularly consuming all of your daily food and drink within less than 8 hours could certainly count, though likely unhealthy if much less time, though I don’t know what qualifies for “much” because I’m not a nutritionist. On the other hand, consuming all of your daily food and drink in a stretch much longer than 8 hours starts becoming questionable if you were intermittently fasting to a sufficient degree to get the health benefits from it. Those would include not eating as much, weight loss, insulin control, better sleep from not eating close to bed time to force the body to digest while sleeping, and so on.

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