Definition: Self Determination Theory (SDT)

Self Determination Theory (SDT)

Self-determination theory (SDT) is a macro theory of human motivation and personality that concerns people’s inherent growth tendencies and innate psychological needs. It is concerned with the motivation behind choices people make without external influence and interference. Practically, it states that for life to be happy and meaningful, we all (universally) need a good extent of life situations where we feel we have competence, autonomy, and relatedness (ability to relate to others and they to you).

  • Wikipedia (first two points, last point in The Good Life Project podcast below)

 

“Nutrients” in the tweet should have been “nutriments”, which means something that nourishes (Merriam-Webster Dictionary), which is close enough to “nutrients” that the definition source lists nutrients as a pretty close synonym.

Definition: Truth Default Theory (TDT)

Truth Default Theory (TDT)

Truth Default Theory is a communication theory which predicts and explains the use of veracity and deception detection in humans. This theory gets its name from its central idea which is the truth-default state. This idea suggests that people presume others to be honest because they either don’t think of deception as a possibility during communicating or because there is insufficient evidence lending them unable to prove they are being deceived.

 

For MUCH more information, and some stunning examples, check out this podcast episode of Revisionist History, called the Queen of Cuba.

My Theory of Deliciousness

The Theory of Deliciousness is a term I learned the evening I created this blog (July 19 2016), from this great article on David Chang’s Unified Theory of Deliciousness, from Wired Magazine. It basically gives his theory on some complex guidelines he has for creating what he hopes to be the next delicious dish for humans despite their backgrounds, cultures, etc.


My Theory of Deliciousness is the presence of balanced contrasting features in one creation to enhance the impact of each feature through a simultaneous presence of the opposing feature. Think “sweet & sour” in Chinese cuisine, for an example. You can appreciate something more if you knew what the opposite of it were like, or had it there to contrast against at the same time. Think of how much better success felt when you had failed numerous times before compared to easy success on the first try. The only difference is no flavour would be considered bad at all times, even if some may be considered negatively most of the time, like bitterness that might be comparable to failure. Each has their own value, especially in certain situations. Continue reading