Life’s Theory of Relativity States That Everything is Relative

How often do you think you can make sense of something, or find meaning in it, without considering something else for context? Probably not often, not even for some reflex reactions because your brain would likely have some experience relative to which it could compare that to which it was were reacting, like pain or cold.

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Definition: Optimal Stopping Theorem, Nerd Sniping, Negativity Threshold

Three beautiful concepts today, with equally beautiful uses!

 

Optimal Stopping Theorem

also known as Early Stopping Theorem

A theorem concerned with the problem of choosing a time to take a particular action, in order to maximise an expected reward or minimise an expected cost (i.e. optimal time to stop something, like dating for best chance at permanent or true love). Also widely used in statistics, economics, and mathematical finance. (Wikipedia)

 

Nerd Sniping

presenting someone, often a mathematician/physicist with a time consuming problem or challenge (often impossible to solve or complete) in the hopes of it appealing to a person’s obsessive tendencies, and/or cause harm from the distraction created.

 

Negativity Threshold

when the wife becomes so frustrated by her husband that she responds very negatively (low threshold is secret to a lasting relationship)

Definition: Myopia Theory

Myopia Theory

Theorizes that when under influence of enough alcohol, the here and now is not only what matters most to you, but also influences what matters to you. That is, you don’t think much about the future and potential consequences, but that also in not thinking, you let your environment determine how you act and feel such that you experience very different things under the same influence if in a quiet bar by yourself versus a crowded and rowdy frat party.

 

More formally…

A cognitive-physiological theory on alcohol abuse in which many of alcohol’s social and stress-reducing effects, which may underlie its addictive capacity, are explained as a consequence of alcohol’s narrowing of perceptual and cognitive functioning.

 

The first explanation is a lot easier to understand, in my opinion. I got it from Malcolm Gladwell in this podcast episode below, talking with Oprah Winfrey.