Why Our Happiness Expectations are So Bad (Science of Well-being Course Week 3)

The content for Week 3 of the¬†Science of Well-being course¬†explained why we are generally so bad at predicting what we think what would make us happy. Professor Santos called them “Annoying Features” of our minds, and referred to the erroneous judgment for happiness outcomes of these Annoying Features as “miswantings”, a term coined by psychologists Tim Wilson and Dan Gilbert. It’s a term which I rather like and will use in discussion of happiness, or lack thereof, with others I know to whom I am humbled that some people turn to discuss rough spots in their lives. There was a lot of video content, which I will summarize and discuss below, with how I compensate for these Annoying Features to keep myself pretty happy generally, allowing for some sadness and other negative feelings to give the happiness more meaning through relativity. My compensation solutions aren’t discussed in the class but that’s my value add with this blog post. Professor Santos had an extensive list of reference articles of research to support her teachings, but I’ll leave them out since many probably won’t care for them. If you do to that level, I suggest signing up for the course on Coursera and taking it for free.

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Is It Time for Another Facebook or Social Media “Friends” List Update?

As part of setting or resetting things in my life for the new year, I updated my Facebook friends list. I mostly dropped some, using tips I wrote in 2010 on which Facebook friends should I remove. However, I also added a few who have recently come into my life and who I can say with some confidence I will see and interact with again numerous times in the near future.

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Why Has NFL Football Remain America’s #1 Sport?

On this biggest sports day of the year, the Super Bowl, I pondered why NFL football remains America’s #1 sport.

NFL football became America’s #1 sport through a variety of complex, interwoven and additive reasons as analyzed here in the Bleacher Report. The reasons why it has remained so, and only widened the gap, are a little different, in my opinion. The latest survey from Harris for ESPN shows some interesting demographic divides among the popular sports, though, but it’s not these demographics I’m looking at, rather the overall results. Finally, I have to be clear that #1 is for watching and interest, not participation. That belongs to soccer, probably for its ease to be able to play without huge costs for gear and facilities to play in.

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