Friendscaping After COVID

https://digitalcitizen.ca/category/writing/Today, I get to share another failed writing contest entry. This one was a freebie to enter from my province’s Writers’ Federation. It was poems to be displayed on our transit buses, with the theme of connections, a limitation of ten lines or fewer, and be suitable for an audience of all ages. There were 70 entries, and ten was chosen, so pretty good odds, but mine was not one. It didn’t earn the accolades, but I’m sure I didn’t help in writing not only semi-classical format with rhyme and even meter in a modern poetry world, but I also wrote on subject matter that might not be suitable for all ages. By that, I don’t mean violent or sexual content, but just the harsh realities of relationships and friendships. I’m sure if some kids read the poem on the bus, they’d have some hard questions for their Parents or adults with them! Regardless, I really liked it, not the least because it’s personal enough to reflect my situation that is core to poetry, while having enough universality as people are re-thinking their relationships and friendships the world over in reopening post-COVID. Read and see what you think.

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The Collective Poet

https://digitalcitizen.ca/category/writing/I’ve always thought poetry as something very personal. As such, when you wrote in the first person voice, you are writing of your perspective and/or your experiences. If you wrote about someone else’s perspectives and/or experiences, like how Chaucer wrote of others’ tales, or how Coleridge wrote of Kubla Khan, among many other examples, you wrote then in the third person voice, aside from personal quotes of certain characters. However, in my newly intensified exposure to modern poetry, I have seen more examples of poets writing in the first person about perspectives and/or experiences not their own. That’s fine as a literary tool in prose, but I’m not yet comfortable with that aspect for poetry given how I associate poetry as something deeply personal, even if only on choice of expression to tell someone else’s story… as if you knew it rather than as if you were it. I’m sure I’m not the only one who thinks of poetry as something deeply personal to be handled this way, but, it seems, the world doesn’t agree with me.

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Phonto and the New Instapoet!

https://digitalcitizen.ca/category/writing/It seems like forever since I have posted. Relatively speaking, for 2021 when I started my two year writing journey, it has been forever. Barely having missed a day, let alone two in a row up until recently, it’s been a week! But rest assured, I have been writing, just not prose. Rather, I’ve been writing lots of “modern poetry”, or what I think is modern poetry, on my microbursts poetry blog. That, too, though, would not be complete accurate. I’ve been writing a ton of drafts, but posting only a bunch, and most of which is for a secret writing project rather than that modern poetry blog I have shared.

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microbursts

https://digitalcitizen.ca/category/writing/I’m making so many changes in my life I can hardly control it all! Despite changes documented here, here, here, and here, that’s actually only about half of all the changes I’ve actually initiated, on my own or in response to other things going on in my life! That includes a change in poetry writing style after 1870 poems, and embracing modern poetry in a new blog for the symbolism and freedom… and one which I just changed the name for a third  time in a week, but for which I have finally found the perfect name, or at least almost perfect name!

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unstructured

https://digitalcitizen.ca/category/writing/Perhaps it shouldn’t come as a surprise to me any more, with how often it has happened in the past, but leave it to me to end up embracing something I didn’t like, wasn’t good at, or both. In this case, it’s modern poetry, and I have come to embrace it in a big way! Now, only time will tell if it lasts, or if it will fade, but I have taken the steps to help it last.

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