The Surest Bets of Stock Market Investment

As mentioned yesterday, I’ve not been writing lots, poetry or prose, due mostly in part to power learning investing in the stock market. It’s long, long overdue I should have done this and lost a lot of opportunities in not having done it earlier, if I had generally taken the “safe” route. Mind you, what I learned recently wasn’t easily, and possibly as nicely, available just several years ago, so I might have been disastrous at it for all I know. Hence, I won’t berate myself too much on the cost of my procrastination as lately as the winter of 2020 when I was going to do this, and ended up learning all the world art history available on Khan Academy. But now that I feel I have a good grasp of things, I’m going to write about it. Why? CERTAINLY NOT to give advice! That’s for sure! No. Why I’m going to be writing about it is from a Chinese philosophy near and dear to my heart, which says you don’t truly know something until you can teach it. Now, I’m not going to “teach” all of investing in this and future posts about investing. No. Far from it! There are great full courses online like Wall Street Survivor where you can get all the info. I’m just going to “teach” my approach, which pulls out the most essential information from all that craziness, and why it’s “good”. Hopefully, with time, I’ll also be able to prove it with data on my outcomes, because getting rich slowly isn’t hard. It’s only trying to get rich quickly that is. So let’s get started!

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I Pay More Taxes Than I Spend and I’m Happy to Continue

https://digitalcitizen.ca/category/writing/I’m a numbers guy. I notice a lot of relations between numbers, in addition to finding them in analysis and such. However, I sometimes miss some for years that when I realize it, I am just stunned as to how I could have missed it. The most shocking example still is the one that has to do with my age when running my first marathon, and which I didn’t realize for like a decade. However, this one about my spending and taxes in recent years comes close.

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Polls for Will There Be More COVID-19 Deaths in 2021 than in 2020?

Oh, those grumpy fools who were constantly whining for most of 2020 for it to end because of the COVID-19 pandemic! What were they thinking, exactly, that 2021 was going to be better? Did they not realize that we would start the year in the middle of Wave 2 that was going to be worse than Wave 1? Or Wave 3, technically, if you were looking at the United States’ numbers. Did they not realize the days would be shorter and darker than when the pandemic really started in March, 2020? Did they not realize the vaccine wouldn’t be out that quickly in terms of everyone wanting one getting it? I don’t know what those people were thinking. I’m an optimistic realist, and that person didn’t see anything close to warranting that optimism. But let’s put that aside and take a good reality check right now.

 

Do you think there will be more COVID-19 deaths in 2021 than in 2020?

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An Interactive Analysis Suite for Google COVID-19 Mobility Data

I recently completed an interactive analysis suite for Google’s COVID-19 mobility data, to let me (and others) do all kinds of comparisons one simply cannot get close to with those static Google mobility data reports! Unfortunately, you will have to go to the Tableau public site, the platform on which I built it, to see and use it because I cannot embed webpages with JavaScript in the WordPress platform this blog is built on.

The Tableau “viz” analysis suite lets you do things like compare for any time period for which Google gave daily data, and even between two time periods. You can also compare any number of countries, regions, even US counties, with data filters. You can compare habits over the days of the week, or see what mobility behaviors people changed (or didn’t, on individual days in a range days). There are “fair expectations” set for each metric based on average to slightly above performance shown to be attainable over a 6 week period, to give further context to the numbers. There is a population filter to compare countries in select ranges of populations. Finally, there are ranks so you don’t have to memorize any numbers in comparing performance in different places and/or over different times. Lots of stuff you can do all kinds of analytics with, draw conclusions about (though be careful on assumptions), and such!

The Tableau viz will be updated roughly once a week, when Google puts out the latest data set. It doesn’t seem they’ll be too consistent with when they do that, but only varying between Thursday and Friday so far. In that Tableau viz is:

  • A table of content tab (at top of view) outlining what is in each tab;
  • A map of the world showing how countries compare for each of the 6 metrics;
  • Continental maps showing regional breakdowns in each country on the continent (where there is data);
  • Even a US county breakdown map;
  • Graphs showing ranks of countries and regions (US counties were too spotty with incomplete data for me to care and give it its own comparison dashboard);
  • Graphs showing select regions against others, allowing comparisons between countries and smaller regions like states and provinces, for example;
  • Graphs showing results over time;
  • Bundled sets of charts in logical order to produce what would be a good briefing report, without text that someone could write for their region/s if they wanted to; and
  • Lots more!

Please click on the link if you want to test out the analytical suite I built. It’s free! No ads or anything! 🙂

Thanks!