Let’s Nickname the New Royal Baby “Cam”

First, let me congratulate all the “other” new (or new again) Mothers and babies born on this date of July 22nd. I’m thinking of you and praying for your well being, future and positive contributions to the world.

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Let’s Be Irrational for Pi Day! (March 14)

Pi Day is observed on March 14th each year, when the month and day (3.14) make up the first 3 digits of the mathematical constant π (pi). Popular ways to celebrate Pi Day include eating pie and discussing the importance of the number. But you know what? That’s SO boring and, well, predictable… and especially ironic considering Pi is an irrational number. That means Pi’s decimals digits are never repeating or “predictable”, since if it did ever repeat, it would become predictable as you had seen the pattern before!

I propose something a helluva lot funner… and harder, to truly celebrate Pi Day and give it its dues. BE IRRATIONAL ALL DAY ON PI DAY!

And how does one go about being irrational?

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Guitar and Ukulele Tabs for It Never Rains in Southern California (Albert Hammond)

The 70s song is about the struggles of a singer who moves out to California to pursue a career in Hollywood but does not have any success and deteriorates in the process. That’s in the words of Wikipedia.

Being in Halifax, Nova Scotia, sometimes known as Haliwood for its local prominence in the movie industry, I sometimes substitute “Nova Scotia” for “California”. It’s just for the cheesy fun of it.

It’s a great and catchy song that’s fairly to play otherwise. For newbies to the song, you can just skip the intro and instrumental bit in the middle. Just go through the verses. There are a few small variations among some of the lines that seem to be repeated, like It never rains in California. Pay attention to those if you want to watch the details, but most people probably wouldn’t care or notice those variations much. Otherwise, the tune is pretty close to the one in the video below.

Albert Hammond

It Never Rains in Southern California, Albert Hammond Guitar Tabs Letter Sized PDF

It Never Rains in Southern California, Albert Hammond Guitar Tabs Tabloid Sized PDF

It Never Rains in Southern California, Albert Hammond Ukulele Tabs Letter Sized PDF

It Never Rains in Southern California, Albert Hammond Ukulele Tabs Tabloid Sized PDF

These tabs all fit on one page to avoid the inconvenience of page turns. However, the letter size tabs (8.5″ x 11″) may be too small for your eyes. If so, you can either enlarge to tabloid size (11″ x 17″) using an automatic enlarge feature on many photocopiers, or download the tabloid sized versions for printing. The tabloid size tabs can be inserted into a typical letter sized binder on the 11″ size, and folded almost in half to fit. You just open each tab to use it.

Please click here for guitar and ukulele tabs and chords to other songs on this blog.

Flesch-Kincaid Grade Reading Level: 8.6

Happy Pi Day! How Are You Celebrating?

Today, March 14 (when this was posted), is Pi Day. March 14th’s date is often written as 3-14, which contains the first three digits of π, so it is chosen as Pi Day. Coincidentally, but rather symbolically appropriate, it is also Albert Einstein’s birthday, and few other dates could be more appropriate in my opinion. That is unless you count Feb 7 as 2-7 and really approximate the natural logarithm e to a useless 2 digits. Geekier people can celebrate Pi Minute at 1:59 AM (24 hour clock only) or 1:59 PM (12 hour clock) on March 14, since 3.14159 is a longer extension of the Pi decimal. I would argue for something like 3:54:32 PM because on the 24 hour clock, 15.935 hours is that time, but that’s probably too geeky even for the mainstream Pi Day celebrators. Mind you, some of them celebrate Pi Second at precisely at 1:59:26 AM or PM on the 12 hour clock, with decimals of a second being really optional to any number of 5-3-5 tenths, hundredths or thousandths of a second. Too short to even let out a scream, though!

So far, I’ve written this article with only a link to π, as if you knew enough about it to get the rest of that first paragraph. You probably do, but in case you don’t, here’s a shortened plain language version.

If you divide the length of a ring by the straight line distance across that ring through the centre, you will always get π. The more precisely you could measure those distances, meaning like to some ridiculously small unit of measure and that you’ve got the correct measure of a perfect ring, the more precise a value of π you will get with more and more decimals. One beauty of π is that while it is always the same, its exact value will never be known because it is what is known as an irrational number, which’s decimals never repeat. You can see π to one million decimals here for yourself if you want to satisfy yourself (might be 100,000 when you find it pending traffic on the server)! Talk about a good way to impress your teacher! The University of Tokyo supposedly has  π calculated out to 200 million digits, but that takes 4.2 GB to download so I’ll leave it at that. In being an irrational number, though, no fraction can represent π. It is sometimes approximated as a fraction of 22/7, but that is not correct. So thank goodness for symbolic representations, eh?

Pi has a lot of beauties to it, both within the number and without in relation to where it appears in the physical relationships of scientific phenomena. If you don’t believe there is a higher being of some sort, seeing the order of the universe involving π almost certainly will make you believe. If you’re still not convinced, I suggest researching the same thing for the natural logarithm e which is the base of all things as it occurs mathematically and naturally, unconstrained by cultures that count by 10, 2 (computers) or some other base. The previous link to π on Wikipedia will tell of many of the beauties of π, with additional links. The Pi Search Page also contains a load, including trivia, frequency of repeating patterns of digit strings, etc. Really geeky stuff on both links, but you know you’d love it so click on through to learn and appreciate!

So with all the amazingness of π to celebrate, how could one sufficiently acknowledge it all? Well, simple, because π is all about simplicity despite its complexity. That is actually a life philosophy of mine, that the simplest things aren’t actually simple. They are only made that way by all the complex details behind it so you had better be prepared to be overwhelmed if you’re going to study or tackle the simplicity of anything, rather than thinking it’s going to be easy!

So to celebrate Pi Day, you just eat pie in keeping it simple!

Geekier folks will add discussing the importance, relevance, properties or other matters involving Pi. I’m coming close with blogging since that isn’t truly a “discussion”. But by discussing Pi, I mean Pi without an e, over Pie with an e, but I’ll take discussing Pi with an e over Pi with an e as well.

In this unhealthy age, walking around something would be good, if only to burn off the pie. Striving for a close to perfect circle as your walking path would be outgeeking yourself.

With Daylight Standard Time having gotten switched at 2 AM this morning, in places that switch, it was a momentous way to celebrate Pi Minute by altering time the minute after. Too bad it doesn’t occur every year!

I am posting this at 1:59 PM my local time as a second Pi Minute celebration. Am I geeky or what, eh???

I’m one hour short with the “spring ahead” clock change, so I’m going to metaphorically be running around all day. If you’re not familiar with English expressions, “running around all day” means keeping busy or doing all kinds of things, whether that is work, chores or someone else. Um, if you’re not familiar with English expressions, you can research that last one. I couldn’t help it with my sense of humour after all the geeky humour leading up to it.

My metaphorical running around all day will literally include a circular 12K running route that isn’t that circular in shape, but goes around part of the peninsula on which I live to end up where I started and close it off. The route will also go around several landmarks.

How will you celebrate Pi Day?

Flesch-Kincaid Grade Reading Level: 9.7

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NHL, AHL, WHL, OHL, QMJHL, NWHL Hockey Fans Facebook Friends Tagging Challenge

I created these tagging challenges for fans of North American hockey, or people who know lots of those fans. The tagging challenges can be done on Facebook, MySpace, LiveJournal or other platforms where you can tag people on pictures.

The idea is to see how diverse is the group of hockey fans you know, and how does that compare to your fellow hockey loving friends. It’s no fun if everybody supported the team you supported, you know!

Pick a Facebook tagging meme of your choice based on the leagues below:

Tag one person you know whose favourite team is represented by the team logo. It has to be that person’s favourite team as you can’t tag a person twice on the same photo.

How many teams can you tag? And how does this compare to your friends who might have done this same challenge?

Here’s how to get these graphics for your tagging fun:

  • Click on a picture below to get it at full size.
  • Right click on that picture and save to your computer.
  • Upload it to your Facebook profile.
  • Tag your friends!

Fancy yourself quite the social sports fan, or this isn’t your sport? Try the same Facebook tagging challenges for:

Please click here for a complete list of over 100 Facebook picture tagging memes on this site with which you can use for fun with your friends.

Enjoy!

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