Death Is The Ultimate Way To Understand Forever

You know what forever means technically, but do you know what it means, practically? What does forever really mean when we live in such a zeptoscopic amount of time in relation to many things in our own history, never mind that of the earth and universe?

The way I thought of forever before I hit adulthood was that it meant something wasn’t going to ever change. That was true, but only applied to things that had already existed in my life so I never really knew otherwise. Events that were forever in change, like deaths, were never that close to me to have a deep impact on my understanding of forever. Sure, some famous musician died so there were no longer going to be new music from them, but I had ways to listen to their past music. It were as if they had only retired, from which they could unretire, rather than passed away. They really weren’t gone forever to me. They just became more distant or less accessible, if you will.

It took the death of my maternal Uncle Tu for me to fully realize what forever meant. He was someone I truly loved who passed away all too soon, without advanced warning to cherish final times. At the moment of loading his casket into the crematorium chamber as one of two leading pallbearers at his funeral, I realized everything I had known of Uncle Tu and thought there would be more of, would be no more. Absolutely no more. His removal from my life due to death, that was forever! Nothing was going to change that. No amount of time was going to reverse that to any degree. That was really it! That was, forever. That was when I realized, and finally understood that death is the ultimate way to understand forever.

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This post is one of 70 quotes I wrote, each with an accompanying essay, in my e-book and paperback Stars I Put in my Sky to Live By, on Amazon or Smashwords (choose your price including free!).

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