Definition: Mortality Paradox

Mortality Paradox

Our struggle to understand how we know we would one day die, yet all the while, we could not imagine a state of our nonexistence.

 

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Cave argues that besides our immortality narratives, what sets us apart from other sentient beings are our highly connected brains and our self-awareness — adaptive developments that have enabled us to foresee different possibilities and make sophisticated plans, but also, in envisioning the future, to grapple with the terrifying prospect of our own demise. He terms this the “Mortality Paradox” and argues that it gives shape to both immortality narratives and civilization itself:

On the one hand, our powerful intellects come inexorably to the conclusion that we, like all other living things around us, must one day die. Yet on the other, the one thing that these minds cannot imagine is the very state of nonexistence; it is literally inconceivable. Death therefore presents itself as both inevitable and impossible.

 

It’s a lot more interesting to learn about this and Immortality Narratives (tomorrow’s post) via this Hidden Brain podcast episode!

Leonard Nimoy Dead at 83. Should I Be Sad?

I just heard that Leonard Nimoy, Spock of Star Trek fame among other things, had passed away at 83 (NY Times).

I am very, very sad upon hearing this. Spock was the first TV character I remembered as a child, even if I knew no English. Those pointed ears and that firm, noble look, as well as calmness of the character, endeared me to him.

It would be ironic to be sad about Mr Nimoy’s death considering the generally emotionally controlled Vulcan character with which I associate with him as one. But sad I am. Actually, I’m feeling something far worse than sadness could convey, though I will try to control it. This is going to be a long, drawn out, sadness, though, because he is synonymous with Star Trek to me so Star Trek will never be the same again. I will always think of him any time I see, hear or think of Star Trek.

As I struggle for what to write regarding Mr Nimoy’s death, a quote from Kirk in Star Trek II, the Wrath of Khan, that is among my favourite movies, seems appropriate.

“Of my friend, I can only say this: of all the souls I have encountered in my travels, his was the most… human.”

Rest in peace, Leonard Nimoy. Your soul and spirit will live and prosper forever.

Giants Matriarch Ann Mara Passes Away on Super Bowl Sunday

There’s never a good day to die… unless you’re Klingon. However, if there were a day for New York Giants football matriarch Ann Mara to pass away, Super Bowl Sunday would be as symbolic as any. She passed away due to complications from a head injury in a fall a few weeks ago (ESPN).

It’s very sad news for the football world on an otherwise big happy day, or more tragic if you dislike the Seahawks and utmostly loathe the Patriots as much as I do.

But here’s to remember a complete class act in Ann and the Giants. Rest in peace, Ann, and soon joy as the Giants will be back at the top again I’m sure.