Definition: Courtesy Bias

Courtesy Bias

A bias where people unconsciously say, and feel, things others would probably deem to be socially acceptable, rather than the truth they would feel in a different situation, especially when different people, or nobody, were present.

From the TEDTalk Daily podcast linked below…

 

The definition I gave above is actually a truer, and fuller, definition than those found in other places like this Alleydog site. That’s because, if you listen to the TEDTalk Daily podcast linked, we don’t always know we’re doing this! That’s why it’s a “bias” and not some completely deliberate action. Biases, rather than conscious choice, are a lot harder to fix. Sort of like how you can’t solve something if you weren’t either aware of it, or be willing to admit it. The typical given definitions suggests we are aware and making a conscious choice to show courtesy bias, but sadly, it ain’t so!

Professional Success is Proportional to Attempts, Not Age

This isn’t the first research to show this, but perhaps the latest. Your chances at success in professional life, whether in start-ups or science, or otherwise, is proportional to the number of attempts you put in. That is, the rate is pretty much constant.

What’s not constant is your productivity. As you age, you attempt things less often, like starting new businesses, publishing papers from experiments, etc. If you try less often, given the same rate of success, it’s no wonder it seems you have more breakthroughs and big successes as you age. However, if you could only get yourself back to the same level of productivity you had once, your rates of success will be back to where it used to be!

Listen to the TEDTalk Daily podcast in the tweet below for more specifics. Also note that performance is something measurable. Success, on the other hand, is defined by us. Without us, or if we change what we deem to be success, everything associated with success can change.

Daily 5 Minute Retrospective Routine at Night

Happy New Year!

Last year, before I went to sleep each night, I took a few minutes to ask myself what was my memory of the day? and get myself an answer for it. Some days, it was quick. Other days, it was not. Most days it was good. Some days, it was not. It was generally a very nice daily retrospective exercise each night, to appreciate each day, often with some gratefulness as well.

This year, I’m needing some more intensity in my life so I’m adding an additional question to that nightly retrospective routine to make it:

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