See Super Bowl LII’s Best and Funniest Commercials BEFORE the Game

Apparently, you can see them ahead of time as shown below! Maybe this has been going on for years. I don’t know. I live in Canada! We don’t get those commercials here in 2018 even if you did watch the big game, unless you had some specialized channels! I always thought you had to at least wait till game day to see them, if not after, but not any more!

Besides, it’s only the Patriots this year. Just watch the commercials now and save yourself some time Sunday! 🙂

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TED 2011 Ads Worth Spreading Winners Far Better Than Super Bowl Collection!

The TED (Technology Entertainment and Design) community just released its 2011 Ads Worth Spreading contest winners, and the ads are more super than the ones I saw for the Super Bowl! But what did you expect from a brilliant group who’s moniker is “Ideas Worth Spreading”? Here are the ads below, in no particular order.

The ads tend to be longer than the Super Bowl ones, where time is so expensive, though the Chrysler Born of Fire and Volkswagen’s The Force are both here. Hey, the cream does rise to the top no matter where you put it. But you know, if ads were this good, I wouldn’t care how long they went on. They’d be better than most things I’d ever find on television!

Some of these ads are also not widely seen, especially in North America, because they come from the world over and not all of these ad makers have money for American television time, much less Super Bowl. However, as a whole collection, I’d take this over the top Super Bowl ads I’ve seen in any year!

This is part 1 of 3 since there are too many commercials to put into one blog post. The link to Part 2 is at at the end.

Enjoy and be prepared to be wowwed!!!

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TED 2011 Ads Worth Spreading, Part 2 of 3

This is part 2 of 3 posts showing all the ads TED deemed worth spreading. (Part 1)

The TED (Technology Entertainment and Design) community just released its 2011 Ads Worth Spreading contest winners, and the ads are better than the ones I have seen for the Super Bowl in any year! But what did you expect from a brilliant group who’s moniker is “Ideas Worth Spreading”?

Now these ads aren’t like ones in the Super Bowl lasting 30-60 seconds. These ads are much longer, often being the full version of the shortened ads for TV time slots. However, with ads like these, I could watch commercials in place of TV shows because I don’t notice how long or short they are. I’m actually a little sad once it’s over, alongside whatever mood the commercials left me in.

I have posted a bunch of the ads here because I have found higher quality versions of the ads than the ones available on the TED website. Otherwise, I’d have just posted links to them all on TED’s site.

The link for Part 3 is at the end of the post.

Enjoy and be prepared to be wowwed!!!

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I’ve Boycotted Most Canadian TV Channels for Replacing Good American Ads

Here in Canada, for a lot of American sport events, the American commercials are replaced with terrible Canadian ones. This is true even on cable on the American channel itself, not just the simultaneous broadcast on the local network. In Nova Scotia, where I am located, the commercials are even sub Canadian standards. They’re so awful I will often skip watching a show or an event, or go out to a place where I can watch it without those commercials. Or I’ll get what I’m looking for from another source, like news from CBC NewsWorld or MSNBC instead of CNN that’s now proliferated with ghetto budget local business ads when I’m there to be thinking globally.

Do these Canadian ad buyers think they’re getting their money’s worth for those prime spots?

I know there are some rules about rights across the borders, and Canadian content rules and such, but that’s for the channels to worry about. The ad buyers don’t have to buy in to this, and without them, the channels don’t have commercials to run. The channels probably offer ad time with events like the Super Bowl as a bonus to a package rather than selling ad time during the event like it’s done in the US. Still, I would decline it if I were a Canadian ad buyer cause I don’t think people think of those spots fondly.

This comes to a point with the Super Bowl. The Super Bowl is as well known for its ads as the game itself. Just observe the chatter the day after the Super Bowl. To watch the Super Bowl with local commercials is like to watch the Super Bowl with one real team and one team of local substitute players. I resent having to watch the Super Bowl with crappy Canadian commercials so much I watch the event on broadcasts with American commercials now, I have blocked the Canadian channels overriding American signals. That means CTV for this Super Bowl, and Global and ASN from previous other offences.

Now, those channels don’t even have a chance that I might surf by and catch something I like when channel surfing. I get local news from the CBC solely now, and you know what? I’m doing just fine without those other channels. I’m not even losing Canadian content, cause it’s not like they show much Canadian content anyway. Why bother with Canadian commercials on prime events, or even just for the Super Bowl, if resentment like this, with some people turning it into action, is what you get?

For events less prime than the Super Bowl, where I might put up with Canadian ads on overridden American shows, I take note of some of the advertising companies and occasionally put them on my “no buy” list. It’s not that I end up watching the commercials to do this. Usually, they annoy me enough from what I’m doing to distract me, and then it’s an easy choice. Eastlink was the first on my list.

I wonder if some of these companies ever imagined their advertising strategies to lead to this?

Oh, and here’s a great example why I go the extra distance for the Super Bowl with the real ads. 🙂

Two children discovered dead – Yahoo!

The way a Yahoo! news story tab about two children being found dead appeared on my browser (and probably yours, too!)

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If you’re here because this blog post title disgusted you and you wanted to see what the hell this was all about, ready to give me some crap for it, then you got the point I’m about to make.

Yahoo! needs to change its branding scheme with its news stories.

Yahoo! has this branding design of putting its brand name after a story headline on your browser tabs. So when there’s a negative story headline that’s short enough to fit the headline and the Yahoo! brand onto a browser tab, it’s rather “inappropriate”. An example is shown above in the graphic, with the red box provided by me to highlight, regarding a story at the time of posting about two children being found dead in Calgary. The result is a browser tab labeled

Two children discovered dead – Yahoo!

Now, if Yahoo! has branded you well, like it has to me and tens, if not millions of hundreds of others, you’d have read that statement as two children discovered dead, with a cowboyish, rowdy banjo supported yaHOOOO-ooooo!!! yodel like at the end of the commercials below.

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It’s “a little inappropriate”, to say the least, and definitely disturbing, though kudos to their ad agency for the great commercials that branded them so well inside my head. Now, if you’ll excuse me, I’m going to get some therapy. If it costs too much, or if it happens again, I’m going to make they run a story one day soon that will show up on my browser tab as

Blogger successfully sues Net giant – Yahoo!

p.s. If you think the example I provided is rare, think again. Think of it as playing the lottery in terms of headline length and the tab length pending your monitor and viewing size. First, how many negative stories are there each day that a Yahoo! following it could make the reading “inappropriate”? For each one, how many users with various monitor and viewing sizes might read it? Not hard to imagine this happens numerous times each day. Even if it’s not that common, ask the branding machine how it likes the possibility happening at all.

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Flesch-Kincaid Grade Reading Level:  7.9

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