A Nickname Jersey Policy Suggestion

The National Basketball Association (NBA) had its first Nickname Game last night (Fri Jan 10 2014) between the Miami Heat and Brooklyn Nets. It is a great marketing tool, with controversy in fan reaction and no clear future for direction. I thought I’d suggest options for a policy that might be used for nickname jerseys, not just in the NBA but also in other professional sports leagues.

Continue reading

If You Can’t Give Students Zero, Give Them 1 or 0.1 Per Cent

In September 2012, Lynden Dorval, a physics teacher in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, was fired for giving students a mark of zero for work that wasn’t handed in or tests not taken (CBC). It went against the school’s policy of not giving students zeroes, apparently, at Ross Sheppard High (and I’m sure at some other schools around the world).

Well, talk about STUPID school policies!

Continue reading

Obama’s 2011 Barackets Now Ahead of 99.9% of ESPN Brackets After Round 2!

President Barack Obama

Please click here to see how President Obama’s ESPN Barackets are doing after the Sweet 16.

Despite some major upsets like #1 Pitt going down, President Obama’s 2011 NCAA March Madness Barackets is now ahead of 99.9% of ESPN brackets after two rounds!

That is behind 7,548 entries, but ahead of about 6 million others!

That’s also a gain of 0.1% from Round 1. Not much, maybe, but it’s not like da Prez had much room to progress standing at 99.8th percentile after Round 1. To gain against the best of the best is outstanding!

Da Prez really has his March Madness mojo going this year! See his Barackets after Round 2 below.

Continue reading

Why Chinese Mothers are NOT Superior (aka Why Chinese Fathers are Not Needed)

Amy Chua with daughters Louisa and Sophia

Yale Law Professor Amy Chua recently released a memoir called Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother. Talk about cheesy titles. Essentially, it was about the so-called “Chinese” method of raising children that was very strict, and why it was superior, as her Wall Street Journal essay (Why Chinese Mothers are Superior, Amy Chua in WSJ, Jan 8 2011).

Essentially, it’s how one clever woman is playing the race card in on offense, in a sly way to keep tension from building while generating debate and getting her lots of money and attention. This book would be nothing but for the hype generated by these racial insinuations.

If you want the details on the no sleepover, no dates, trashing your children, threatening to burn your children’s toys, forcing them to take either piano or violin and not settling for As in school, you can read the WSJ link above or the multitude of other related articles like this one from Canada’s Globe & Mail (Why Chinese Parenting is Best, G&M Jan 11 2011).

Note again the racial insinuation in the title.

That’s because its supposed “self-deprecating” nature that was in good jest, according to Amy, is all hear say and not backed up by anything but her opinion. She is presenting an argument on what isn’t “visible”, concentrating on what is, which is the successful products of the method. But how many have been failed by the method and had their lives ruined, and who will never be known?

Continue reading

Which Were the Most Popular and Interesting Cartoons You Saw for the Facebook Campaign Against Child Abuse?

Snoopy

Last weekend, the first weekend in December, there was a global campaign on Facebook where people replace their profile pictures with their favourite cartoon character/s.

I was happy to see a lot of my Facebook friends took part. It was really interesting to see what everybody chose for their characters.

Being the curious type, the two most obvious question I had were which characters were the most popular, and which were interesting?

For the most interesting, I would have to give that to my friend Dan, who chose Banana Man.

For the most popular, that’s a much harder question to answer with any confidence. I don’t have enough Facebook friends to get a statistically significant result. Fortunately, I have this site which I estimate provided about 20,000 cartoon pictures to people looking for them over the weekend. Talk about suffocating from smog from the traffic from my blog! OMG!!!

Of course, I don’t have all the comic book characters out there, but I probably have about 500, of which 250 were here. That’s a decent sample size variety for me. I also have visitors from around the world.

From stats on this website, from what I could tell, Snoopy from the Peanuts strip was the most popular character (sometimes with Charlie Brown and Woodstock so hard to separate them out.

Comic book heroine Wonder Woman was a close second.

My Melody from the Hello Kitty strip was third.

Wilma Flintsone was fourth.

Homer Simpson was fifth.

Cinnamoroll from Hello Kitty was sixth.

Catwoman was seventh.

Love-a-lot Bear from the Care Bears was eighth.

Pebbles Flintstone was ninth.

Finally, Lucky Bear from the Care Bears was tenth.

I haven’t seen any articles yet which gives a large sample size for the most popular character, but if you do, please do share.

What about among your Facebook friends? Who was the most popular character or most popular cartoon strip?

And don’t forget about the most interesting character you saw.