Video and Analysis of Usain Bolt’s 9.58s World Record Breaking 100m in Berlin

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Also see Usain break the 200m world record days later in 19.19s.

BERLIN (Aug 16 2009) — At the IAAF Championships in Berlin, Jamaican super sprinter Usain Bolt destroyed his own 100m world record set at the Beijing Olympics last year by 0.11 seconds with just 41 strides. He lowered the record from 9.69 seconds to a remarkable 9.58 seconds and stunned the Berlin crowd in attendance because the 100m records is supposed to be broken in hundredths of a second, not tenths of a second! I don’t doubt he also stunned the rest of the world, whether or not you had high expectations for the guy.

Interestingly enough, Usain’s coach, Glenn Mills, predicted in January 2009 that Usain could run the 100m in 9.58 second (Daily Mail UK)

“I’ve heard my coach (Glen Mills) talk of 9.58 seconds (in the 100m),” said Bolt. “He also said it could be possible for me to go under 19 seconds in the 200m.”

Don’t expect that record to last too long, though, unless Usain gets injured or something. Usain still took time to look over to the clock at the left before finishing instead of going full tilt to the finish line. Check the video above. As well, these athletes peak between 26 to 33 years old. Usain will turn 23 on Aug 21. He also ran this race near sea level (about 40m above in Berlin). At altitude where the air is a bit thinner, and with a tail wind instead of a head wind (2.0m/s legal), who knows what he could do??? Incredible!

I’ll tell you one thing. There’s a lot of hype about a lot of people, but this guy lives up to it!

Congratulations, Usain! Now let’s get to that sub-19 200m your coach was talking about for the birthday present! 🙂

Defending world champion Tyson Gay of the United States came a distant second in a fast 9.71 seconds, lowering the American record from 9.77 seconds. It was the first time Usain and Tyson had met in a 100m race in over a year and this was possibly the most anticipated 100m final since 1988 Summer Olympics when Carl Lewis and the now disgraced Ben Johnson went head-to-head. Asafa Powell was third.

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Position Lane Bib Athlete Country Mark
React
1 4 656 Usain Bolt JAM 9.58 (WR) 0.146
2 5 1183 Tyson Gay USA 9.71 (NR) 0.144
3 6 665 Asafa Powell JAM 9.84 (SB) 0.134
4 3 111 Daniel Bailey ANT 9.93 0.129
5 8 1116 Richard Thompson TRI 9.93 (SB) 0.119
6 1 492 Dwain Chambers GBR 10.00 (SB) 0.123
7 2 1110 Marc Burns TRI 10.00 (SB) 0.165
8 7 1215 Darvis Patton USA 10.34 0.149

Wind = 0.9 m/s (legal) — NR = New Record — SB = Season Best

Other notes:
In the semi-finals, Usain ran a “casual” 9.89… and I mean casual. He looked like he was jogging it in, and that’s no exaggeration. By contrast, Tyson Gay ran a huge effort full of tension in semi-final 2 only to win it in 9.93 seconds. Usain Bolt only takes 40-41 strides to cover the 100m, with a stride length of about 2.7 to 3 metres (9-10 feeth) in full flight mid-race. That would be mid-race because he hasn’t ran full flight across the finish time in a big race for a while, I don’t imagine. Usain is 6’5″, very tall by sprinting standard, but with his high turnover that he can put to his huge stride length, there’s not anybody who can come close to matching what he can do right now. Might he change the profile of athletes to be recruited and/or developed for sprinting in the future? The short height profile seems to have maxxed out.

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What’s Your Song of Comfort? (Part 3 of 7 on The World in Six Songs)

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Book and Theory Background

Daniel J. Levitin wrote an absolutely brilliant book called The World in Six Songs, supported by a great website with the many music samples referenced, among other great related material.

My basic paraphrasing of the concept is this. All the songs in the world could be fit into at least one of six categories providing an evolutionary benefit to humanity, often ultimately tied to our social nature.

The book and website offer far more detailed interpretations, of course, but I will expand on my paraphrasing with each post and the associated topic.

Daniel J. Levitin and The World in Six SongsIn a series of posts, I will describe each of the six categories in brief, one at a time:

  1. Friendship
  2. Joy
  3. Comfort
  4. Knowledge
  5. Religion
  6. Love

I will describe what the categories are about because they are not as limited in scope as the category names suggest. I will then supply one of my choices and ask all readers to do the same if they so wish. In the seventh post of the series, I will offer the chance to put the song choices all together so readers can read the entire set on one post. I do this because it would be a long post to describe all six categories at once, but to have all the answers in one place might be nice.

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This post focuses on Songs of Comfort

July 30th add-on in italics, from Dan Levitin in a summary article
This category of song provides comfort in times of loneliness, stress or heartbreak, along with the classic comfort song, the lullaby. Music written about loneliness and stress can provide us with comfort by assuring us we are  not alone in our grief or misery, aiding the recovery process. Lullabies mutually calm mother and child, and may release prolactin, while at the same time providing a bond between the two, which is beneficial for the child.

These songs make us feel more comfortable, whether by easing us into more comfort or relieving us of discomfort. Often, it is the latter, and often through letting us know we are not alone in whatever predicament the songs are trying to relieve us of, that we have a place in the greater whole. Sometimes, songs of Comfort may overlap with Friendship / Bonding category, but should only be considered as such if they were also motivating one to bond or forge direct relationship. If one truly wanted to fit a song into only one category, should the encouragement to bond be present, then consider the song a Friendship / Bonding song, not a comfort song. Encouragement to bond in a way related to “love” will be dealt with later but that also trumps the Comfort category if there were two possibilities and one only wanted to fit a song into solely one category.

Sad songs are the most common form of Comfort songs, but so are lullabies and blues. Comfort songs’ benefit to our evolution is that they cause the release of prolactin, a tranquilizing hormone that comforts us, among many other purposes. Obviously, comfort during times of stress, or even just more comfort in good times, benefits our survival.

Audio sample of songs from the Comfort chapter in The World in Six Songs can be found on the website. No direct link was available, but click on the Songs menu option and appropriate page number range link carrying pages 111 to 136. Please note that not all songs are meant as samples of Comfort songs. Some are just referenced material in the book text.

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Author Daniel Levitin chose

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My choice for Song of Comfort is

Solitude, as sung by Billie Holiday (lyrics).

Written by Eddie Delange, Irving Mills, Duke Ellington, this bluesy jazz standard talks about a person in solitude longing for her (or his) lover who has left her/him. However, because the singer sings it like it’s happening to her, the listener regards it as someone else going through the same situation. As for my insistence upon the Billie Holiday version, well, let’s just say there’s nobody who knows how to make a song sadder than Billie. She’s got an album titled Lady Sings the Blues, for which she wrote the title track, for a very good reason. I could actually listen to any Billie Holiday song, sad or happy, and I would feel better if I were feeling sad. She’s got that “honest signal” quality in her singing to persuade the listener she knows what she’s talking about rather than faking it. “Honest signal” is discussed by Daniel Levitin in the Love chapter as being regarded as superior to speech because it is more challenging to fake singing an emotion than talking about it.

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What is your choice for Song of Comfort?

Please leave your choice as a comment.

Lyrics and YouTube/audio link would greatly enhance your answer so readers can know more about your choice. They are not necessary, though, and not possible if no lyrics or version exist.

You can include songs you wrote as a choice, too!

Flesch-Kincaid Grade Reading Level: 10.1