Try Keeping a Memory of the Day (MOD) Journal

I had an idea today that I am very excited about trying. Just 11 days into this year, every single day has had at least one thing rather memorable for me. I’m not going to be able to remember it all, or at least all at once, in the long run, so I thought I’d do a journal where I decide on a Memory of the Day or MOD for each day.

With it, I’ll also record “candidates” vying for each day’s title, meaning other things memorable, no matter how big or small. A candidate today that won’t win is my coming across coconut bread on sale while impromptu grocery shopping with time to spare between events. I had never eaten coconut bread before so I figured a $2 risk was worth taking to try it. It’s quite good! Small life changer there that if I ever come across it again, I’ll definitely buy it!

News of David Bowie’s passing will probably take the title today, though. The memories don’t always have to be good, though news of his passing led to a lot of happy times recollection about his music, character and influence in my world today. Bad memories might not seem pleasant to document, but for me, if there are enough of them in a row, I’m going to work that much harder to make sure the next MOD ain’t gonna be one of those bad memories. That’s just who I am as a person.

I realize not everyone can document a lot of bad moments in their lives with positive impact, so this idea isn’t for everyone. However, I think there’s enough merit in it for everyone to at least try to know. It certainly has never been easier with apps rather than something like a word processing document that is cumbersome to handle some nice, but rather limited, formatting you might want in a journal.

Now all I need to decide is which app to use for this that is iOS, Android and Web compatible. I have an iPhone with an Android tablet for reasons forced on to me by life, and I like the idea of a Web backup like GoogleDrive. Flava and Penzu seem to be my choices, with links provided being to one set of reviews, but neither seem ideal. Penzu requires paying for some features I want, whereas Flava seems to have taken off their Chrome extension. Their own website’s link to the Chrome store is broken and I can’t find it in there. It’s quite nice otherwise. As a result, I’m also going to try Journey and see if their quirks like only one photo per page and no videos have been eliminated.

I get the feeling my MOD 2016 book is going to be quite a read by the end of the year! Or at least I’m gonna do my darnest to make it so!

Good luck if you try it yourself!

Researched Suggestions for Writing the Next Hit Song in America

A new study published in the Journal of Psychology of Aesthetics, Creativity and the Arts suggests that the most popular songs in American culture these days are increasingly about oneself, especially one’s angry or antisocial behaviour (DeWall, C. Nathan; Pond, Richard S., Jr.; Campbell, W. Keith; Twenge, Jean M., Mar 21 2011).

See the more complete and easier to read Miller-McCune article here.

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Why Chinese Mothers are NOT Superior (aka Why Chinese Fathers are Not Needed)

Amy Chua with daughters Louisa and Sophia

Yale Law Professor Amy Chua recently released a memoir called Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother. Talk about cheesy titles. Essentially, it was about the so-called “Chinese” method of raising children that was very strict, and why it was superior, as her Wall Street Journal essay (Why Chinese Mothers are Superior, Amy Chua in WSJ, Jan 8 2011).

Essentially, it’s how one clever woman is playing the race card in on offense, in a sly way to keep tension from building while generating debate and getting her lots of money and attention. This book would be nothing but for the hype generated by these racial insinuations.

If you want the details on the no sleepover, no dates, trashing your children, threatening to burn your children’s toys, forcing them to take either piano or violin and not settling for As in school, you can read the WSJ link above or the multitude of other related articles like this one from Canada’s Globe & Mail (Why Chinese Parenting is Best, G&M Jan 11 2011).

Note again the racial insinuation in the title.

That’s because its supposed “self-deprecating” nature that was in good jest, according to Amy, is all hear say and not backed up by anything but her opinion. She is presenting an argument on what isn’t “visible”, concentrating on what is, which is the successful products of the method. But how many have been failed by the method and had their lives ruined, and who will never be known?

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