Definition: Dépaysement (French)

Dépaysement

[ pronounced dePAZEmon ]

French for a feeling of giddiness you feel in an unfamiliar place, even if a bit unsettling where your excitement for being there overcomes it.

  • From the TEDTalk below (at about 11:25), by Tiffany Watt Smith, which includes a bunch of emotions where there are no words in English, but which you may well have experienced, but never had one single word to describe them! Or which you may go out and try to see if you can conjure up the feeling from hints in its definition for where and/or under what conditions one might experience it.

 

You’d need a strong sense of curiosity about this one, cause the natural feeling towards many unfamiliar places is fear or hesitation or trepidation of some sort.

Advertisements

Definition: Amae (Japanese)

Amae

[ pronounced aMAI ]

Japanese for a feeling of pleasure when you are temporarily hand over the safety of your life to someone else.

  • From the TEDTalk below (at about 11:25), by Tiffany Watt Smith, which includes a bunch of emotions where there are no words in English, but which you may well have experienced, but never had one single word to describe them! Or which you may go out and try to see if you can conjure up the feeling from hints in its definition for where and/or under what conditions one might experience it.

 

You would need to really trust someone to do this, but it’s quite possible for many.

Definition: Toska (Russian)

Toska

[ pronounced TOSka ]

Russian word for a longing with nothing to long for. A feeling of maddening dissatisfaction, said to blow in from the great plains.

  • From the TEDTalk below (at about 5:30), by Tiffany Watt Smith, which includes a bunch of emotions where there are no words in English, but which you may well have experienced, but never had one single word to describe them! Or which you may go out and try to see if you can conjure up the feeling from hints in its definition for where and/or under what conditions one might experience it.

 

Under Communism and/or those long and cold Russian winters, I can see from where this most depressing of words might have originated! Might qualify for the most depressing word I know, at least to describe feelings of sadness.