Another Non-Traditional Origami Crane

My goal with origami can be summed up as “replicable originality”. I’m not going to outdo anybody on complexity or intricacy or variety of pieces. What I will “bring to the game” are twists on some traditions on origami that others will be able to do, and that I hope others will give a try with their own variations. Here’s an example of what I’m talking about.

Continue reading

Cellophane Origami

People make origami (Japanese paper folding) out of all kinds of paper. What you get are things in different colours, or with different patterns on them. Rarely do people make origami out of translucent paper, which may give you a little insight into how the paper folds on the inside of what you can see.

Continue reading

A Slight Improvement to the Traditional Origami Crane

The traditional Japanese origami crane has a fold along the length of each wing, as shown below.

Continue reading

First Try at Micro Origami

I saw this video tonight about how a medical school in Japan tested its young potential surgeons with some really tough hand coordination tests, rather than more routine tests.

One of the tests was to make a 5 mm origami crane, which means the original square was 1 cm in size since the crane folds into a wing height about half of the square size. You can also check the video against real squares you create to get an idea. As one who does origami, I figured I’d give it a go, though I wanted to start with the 2 cm squares first to get an idea of how hard it was going to be. Those are 4X the area, by the way, since area is two dimensional so difference in size on each square side is multiplied by each other! Here are some pics of my results below.

Continue reading

Die Cut Paper Origami

Origami is interesting for its technique, but it can also be interesting for the paper used if you’re not just using conventional paper or origami paper. There is origami paper with prints, metallic shine, maybe even texture. However, tonight, I took things to a different level for myself by doing origami with die cut paper.

Continue reading