Definition: Courtesy Bias

Courtesy Bias

A bias where people unconsciously say, and feel, things others would probably deem to be socially acceptable, rather than the truth they would feel in a different situation, especially when different people, or nobody, were present.

From the TEDTalk Daily podcast linked below…

 

The definition I gave above is actually a truer, and fuller, definition than those found in other places like this Alleydog site. That’s because, if you listen to the TEDTalk Daily podcast linked, we don’t always know we’re doing this! That’s why it’s a “bias” and not some completely deliberate action. Biases, rather than conscious choice, are a lot harder to fix. Sort of like how you can’t solve something if you weren’t either aware of it, or be willing to admit it. The typical given definitions suggests we are aware and making a conscious choice to show courtesy bias, but sadly, it ain’t so!

The World Not Designed for Women That Could Be

If you hadn’t noticed, the world around you isn’t designed for women. Even if you had noticed like I have, I bet you hadn’t noticed it to the extent Caroline Criado Perez, author of Invisible Women: Data Bias in a World Designed for Men, does. Man, it’s shocking!

Despite how incredible the bias is, it’s nothing compared to the ignorance and unwillingness to change it, like with car seat dummies in crash testing. They use a scaled down 50 percentile male and puts it in the passenger seat! That’s where they even try rather than just stick to the 50 percentile male. What? Women don’t drive? Or maybe aren’t stupid so they couldn’t make a dummy of one to be fair, or risk being offensive in doing so? Yes, that must be the reason [sarcasm, if you can’t detect it].

So many more eye opening examples are in the 99 Percent Invisible podcast below, including some really obscure ones you’d have trouble grasping, like how snow plowing patterns are designed for male driving. But still not enough for me as I’m going to have to get the book to learn more, being a designer of many things myself. I’m sure I’ve designed numerous things unknowingly biased towards me, but I’ve also learned to correct my ways such as giving women pockets in some garments I have designed for them… and equal sized pockets to men at that rather than ones 40% smaller that the fashion industry gives them!