Definition: False Belief Test

False Belief Test

A test that provides unequivocal evidence that children understand that a person can be mistaken about something they themselves understand.

 

In plainer language, it confirms that a child has reached an age where they realize a person can see the world differently from how they do. That’s if the child passes the test, of course. Sad state of the world is such that there are more than enough adults these days who would fail this test.

 

From this mind-opening TedRadio Hour podcast…

Jogging Extends Life Expectancy for Men by 6.2 Years and Women by 5.6 Years?

That’s what the Copenhagen City Heart Study would tell you! And that’s no small fad study, either! It’s been ongoing since 1976, with the first set of data collected between 1976 and 1978, the second from 1981 to 1983, the third from 1991 to 1994, and the fourth from 2001 to 2003. The study followed 20,000 men and women of all different ages, between 20 and 90. Among them were 1,116 male joggers and 762 female joggers. Further, this study has been cited in over 750 scientific papers!

Continue reading

The Tipping Point Numbers for Social Change

These are targets every person or group trying to instill social change needs to know to gauge the likelihood or their success.

Recent research has shown that for true social change to occur, you’d need 7-10% of a population to hold an unshakable belief to be able to change the belief of that population within a reasonable amount of time. This is as long as there isn’t another group with another unshakable belief opposing it, like a different religion (Discovery News, August 6 2011). Combine that with the 1% you need to start a movement (Microtrends, by Mark Penn) and you’ve got two real targets for any organization seeking to create lasting social change. There’s none of those around these days, are there? 🙂

Continue reading