How to Make Proper iPad and iPad2 Wallpapers (1024 x 1024 pixels)

The iPad has a 1024 x 768 pixel screen, and so does the iPad2.

However, it can be used horizontally as well as vertically. So what happens to your wallpaper when you turn the iPad’s orientation since it reverses the vertical and horizontal dimensions? That is, it goes from 1024 pixels wide to 768 pixels wide, and 768 pixels high to 1024 pixels high.

When you turn iPad from the horizontal to vertical orientation, or vice-versa, it automatically rotates its wallpaper to match. But that’s all it does, in rotating your wallpaper. It does not resize it to fit the new dimension. Good thing, too, cause pictures of you and your friends would be rather ugly in one orientation or another… even if skinny ugly and not just fat ugly.  See Figures 1 and 2 below that shows no resizing in iPad wallpapers with rotation of orientation (please click to enlarge).

What that means is you need a square wallpaper that is 1024 pixels in each dimension. What it also means is that some parts of your wallpaper will never be seen, and some parts will only be seen. See Figure 3 for visual of descriptions below.

A square of 128 x 128 pixels in each corner will never be seen (black areas).

Do not put anything important here if you want your wallpaper to look nice in both orientations of usage.

A strip 128 pixels high and 768 pixels wide at the top and bottom center will only be seen in the vertical orientation (red areas).

Do not put anything important here if you want your wallpaper to look nice in both orientations of usage.

A strip 768 pixels high and 128 pixels wide at the left and right center will only be seen in the horizontal orientation (green areas).

Do not put anything important here if you want your wallpaper to look nice in both orientations of usage.

A square 768 pixels on each side, appearing at the center of the image, will always be seen (white area).

Make sure everything critical to your image is in this area.

So how do you make sure you have something that works?

Well, it’d be a real pain to have to measure out everything all the time. The easiest sure way I can think of is to take the image in Figure 3 to place over your image and make it half see-through (or 50% opacity), so see if anything important in your image is in the covered area.

That’s still a pain, though, I know. “Eyeballing” the “covered patches” in Figure 3 is the only quick way of doing things. It’s not perfect, but it could be effective. You’re basically looking at cutting out 1/8 of your picture from each side (for the covered areas).

The easiest, but not necessarily fail safe, way to do it is to find your favourite 1280 x 1024 wallpapers and crop out a square the height of the full picture. Hold down the Shift key when you crop usually gives you a square. Then stretch it to the full height of the picture. Then move your square around so the 1/8 strips around the edges don’t seem to take up any important parts of your picture. Then crop and there you have it! The nicest thing about this method is that the 1280 x 1024 monitors are very popular and there are tens, of not hundreds, of millions of wallpapers already existing for them from which you can turn into iPad wallpapers.

I “eyeballed” things to create the wallpaper in Figure 4 (which is an image from the movie Avatar), and did OK.

In case you liked my “eyeballing sample” in Figure 4, I’ve included the real wallpaper for your use in Figure 5.

If you use it, Figure 6 shows how it will appear on your iPad in the horizontal orientation.

Figure 7 shows how it will appear on your iPad in the vertical orientation.

If you have any experience with Photoshop Actions (and have Photoshop at your disposal), you can always record an Action where you place the guides down. I find zooming to 400% helps accurately placing guides at 128 pixels in (and at 896 pixels from the far edge of 1024). Then you create another Action to remove those guides using the Clear Guides command under the View menu (in CS3). I have these set up so after I’ve cropped an image, I click on an Action to see the guides showing my cut-offs. If I am satisfied, I click on the next Action to clear them and Save. If not, I just Undo a few steps and crop again and test it again.

If you’ve got better methods, please do share! Thanks!

Please click here to see the iPad wallpapers I have created
(using Photoshop actions to verify their suitability).

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Flesch-Kincaid grade reading level: 7.4

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Generation One (G1) Autobot Cartoon Avatars, Buddy Icons and Profile Pics for Facebook, MySpace, Twitter, Bebo and Other Applications

The Generation One Autobot icons below appeared in the cartoon series from 1984 to 1986. Their names have a double digit after them indicate the year of their debut. History and most of the artwork were courtesy of Adam Botch the Crab’s Transformers Box Art Archive. More information on each Autobot can be found at the archive or Wikipedia. In the latter, there a pretty good sized entry for most of the Transformers! It’s all very fascinating if you love the franchise, though rather violent with the comic book sagas where Transformers have their heads blown off, literally!

I have added a bit more punch to most of the artwork scans (i.e. a tad more contrast and saturation). I have also converted them to 256 pixel square pictures, with the graphic as large as possible, for use as avatars, buddy icons and profile pictures. You can use these pretty much for any application, including blogging avatars, since most don’t need a graphic as large as 256 pixels. Facebook and MySpace tend to max that out.

To get an icon:

  • Click on the thumbnail you want to get it at full size
    (there is NO grey trim on the downloadable picture).
  • Right click on that picture and save to your computer.
  • Upload it to your Facebook or other profiles.
  • Click the Back button on your browser to come back to here or click the thumbnails below the picture to move on to the next picture.
  • Come back another day whenever you feel like using a new one, or download them all now!
  • Please click here for a complete list of avatars, buddy icons and themed Facebook profile pictures on this site (see blue header near bottom of destination page).

Please click here to see all the Transformers products (Generation One and Movie) on this site, which include:

  • Avatars, buddy icons and Facebook profile pictures
  • Collectible Trading Cards (print like regular 6″ x 4″ photo)
  • Facebook tagging pictures
  • Posters (18″ x 24″)
  • Wallpapers of many sizes

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Flesch-Kincaid Grade Reading Level: 8.1