Definition: Immortality Narratives

Immortality Narratives

The four ways humans have generally come up with for being able to live, or at least exist, forever:

  1. Rejuvenation (get younger)
  2. Resurrection (rise from the dead)
  3. Reincarnation (transformed from the dead in another form)
  4. Fame (remembered in history, culture, records, memories of others)

 

Epically fascinating stuff from the Hidden Brain podcast below that also discussed the Mortality Paradox described in yesterday’s post!

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Definition: Mortality Paradox

Mortality Paradox

Our struggle to understand how we know we would one day die, yet all the while, we could not imagine a state of our nonexistence.

 

More text includes

Cave argues that besides our immortality narratives, what sets us apart from other sentient beings are our highly connected brains and our self-awareness — adaptive developments that have enabled us to foresee different possibilities and make sophisticated plans, but also, in envisioning the future, to grapple with the terrifying prospect of our own demise. He terms this the “Mortality Paradox” and argues that it gives shape to both immortality narratives and civilization itself:

On the one hand, our powerful intellects come inexorably to the conclusion that we, like all other living things around us, must one day die. Yet on the other, the one thing that these minds cannot imagine is the very state of nonexistence; it is literally inconceivable. Death therefore presents itself as both inevitable and impossible.

 

It’s a lot more interesting to learn about this and Immortality Narratives (tomorrow’s post) via this Hidden Brain podcast episode!

Definition: Socially Prescribed Perfectionism

Socially Prescribed Perfectionism

Perfectionistic motivations due to the fact that important people in one’s life expect one to be perfect.

  • Wikipedia

 

That’s not quite the definition I got from the TEDRadio Hour podcast episode below. It was more like

 

A definition of perfectionism people get from seeing others’ curated posts on social media.

 

That is, people selectively posts only what they want to tell about their lives, which is usually a vast imbalance of the good things, often exaggerated for falsified, and others who view enough of it start setting that amalgamation of all they see as their idea of a perfect life, as if someone had it and they didn’t, when even the truth is those who posted all that stuff don’t even have a life close to it. It’s a perfection that’s socially prescribed to them via social media.