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The performance summary below was a nice little features the people at WordPress.com did for their blogs. Now if only I could find a way to turn it into some monetary income.

WordPress.com should set some traffic rewards where you can get credits to use to purchase their services, like storage space, or domain mapping. I pay for these things just to make this blog function the way I want it to. To think, I donate all this time to work on this personal interest, and people came here as much as they did (2.3+ million page views and about 700,000 downloads), and I still had to pay money to maintain it.

That small possible improvement aside, in my opinion, I would like to genuinely thank WordPress.com for all the hard work they do to provide such a wonderful blogging platform! I did do a review of most of the other well-known platforms before deciding on using WordPress.com and I am glad I did!

The stats helpers at WordPress.com mulled over how this blog did in 2010, and here’s a high level summary of its overall blog health:

Healthy blog!

The Blog-Health-o-Meter™ reads Wow.

Crunchy numbers

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It’s hard to tab gospel music, if you know what gospel music can be like to perform with all its passionate fervour, improvisation and such. This isn’t meant as a tab as much as a starting guide for you to create your own version of this popular gospel. The version below is a relatively quiet version from which I created the guitar and ukulele tabs found below that.

Walter Hawkins

Going Up Yonder, Walter Hawkins Guitar Tabs Letter Sized PDF

Going Up Yonder, Walter Hawkins Guitar Tabs Tabloid Sized PDF

Going Up Yonder, Walter Hawkins Ukulele Tabs Letter Sized PDF

Going Up Yonder, Walter Hawkins Ukulele Tabs Tabloid Sized PDF

If the letter size tabs (8.5″ x 11″) are too small for your eyes, you can either enlarge to tabloid size (11″ x 17″) using an automatic enlarge feature on many photocopiers, or download the tabloid sized versions for printing. The tabloid size tabs can be inserted into a typical letter sized binder on the 11″ size, and folded almost in half to fit. You just open each tab to use it.

Please click here for guitar and ukulele tabs and chords to other songs on this blog.

I picked the choral version above to tab because it was the most “practical” one to tab. You can document something reasonably similar to that version, aside from all the harmony parts you couldn’t sing simultaneously if you were to do this solo. However, if you’re adventurous, you can add your own touches to this song and make it as different from the version above as the version below… all 10 minutes of it! It is soloed by Tramaine Hawkins.

It’s generally the same style so you should be able to use pretty much the same chords if you sing it using the notes in the tab PDFs. However, it has a complete different swing and swagger. You could add a reasonably facsimile with your singing and some funky strumming if you give it a try.

Enjoy!

Flesch-Kincaid Grade Reading Level: 9.0

Leaving on a Jet Plane is a fantastic example why tabs and chord files you tend to find online, without notes written out, can be so problematic. The slightest change in how you sing a phrase can cause a different chord to be used. But without the notes, you just see a chord. Unless you happen to sing the phrase the same way in terms of notes, the listed chords might sound quite wrong to you. Or singing by ear, you might find trying to fit the phrase into the chording given is rather awkward.

John Denver

In my tabbed files below, I have two sets of chords for each file, though they are both in the same key. It’s just a matter of how you phrase the first line, and some subsequent lines like it within the verse. If a C is your high note, as John Denver sings it in the video above, then one set of chords works well for it. If B is your high note, just a semi-tone below that C, another set of chord works better. But if there were no notes written out, you’d be scrambling to try to figure it out. And you’d be wrong if you sang it with a B for the high note, if you were a purist to try to sing it “right”.

That said, though, on the ukulele, I would actually recommend singing the version with the B high note in that first line (page 2 of the ukulele tabs). The C chord is just too open for my liking in the middle of the phrase. But that’s just my take. You play what you want. Hopefully, having these two versions will give you one that’s reasonably close to how you would sing it. Any further deviations and well, you’re on your own, I’m afraid. :-)

But this is a prime example of why I have notes written out with my tabs and chords, aside from helping you (and me) sing things correctly.

I also left out a few chords on the ukulele version which didn’t add as much colour as the chords in the guitar version did. Most noticeably, I left out a bunch of D7 chords in the ukulele version, or just used a D. They were arranged in the guitar as such to denote mid-verse and end verse points, leading to transitions or not. But on the ukulele, l;et’s just say I’m not the biggest fan of the D7 chord in the C6 tuning of GCEA. You get to avoid it if you use a ADF#B tuning like Chalmers Doane preferred his ukuleles. In this song, where the D7  is used, it follows a D. As such, then, instead of using the barred version of D7, I recommend just dropping your pinky (baby) finger on to the 3rd fret of the A string while hold the D previously with your other three fingers.

Leaving on a Jet Plane, John Denver Guitar Tabs Letter Sized PDF

Leaving on a Jet Plane, John Denver Guitar Tabs Tabloid Sized PDF

Leaving on a Jet Plane, John Denver Ukulele Tabs Letter Sized PDF

Leaving on a Jet Plane, John Denver Ukulele Tabs Tabloid Sized PDF

If the letter size tabs (8.5″ x 11″) are too small for your eyes, you can either enlarge to tabloid size (11″ x 17″) using an automatic enlarge feature on many photocopiers, or download the tabloid sized versions for printing. The tabloid size tabs can be inserted into a typical letter sized binder on the 11″ size, and folded almost in half to fit. You just open each tab to use it.

Please click here for guitar and ukulele tabs and chords to other songs on this blog.

Flesch-Kincaid Grade Reading Level: 6.6

This Beatles classic was written by George Harrison and has been used by him so much it seems wrong now to say the song was by the Beatles rather than George. The song is tabbed pretty much as is in the recording people know best, which is the one used in the video below.

George Harrison

The one thing my tabs call for, though, is that the singer also sings all the main instrumental phrasings. You can hum it, if you like, but I prefer to use “doo doo”. It makes for a song with a lot of “doo doo” in it, but a good one! :-)

All the notes are written out so wherever you see notes in the main body of the lyrics, you sing or hum them.

There is a bit of syncopated strumming in the middle instrumental interlude. “Slash” characters describe them. Read them left to right so if they rise, you’re on an upstroke, whereas if they fall, you’re on a down stroke. It’d be hard to describe it more without a video to show it, which I may some day, but I think if you listen to the song and try to strum along, you’ll get it. It’s not that difficult.

If you do the strumming and singing of the instrumental parts on top of the regular song, you’ll find you won’t feel like you need a band to play a pretty good version of this great tune. The depth of talent in the Beatles still blows my mind!

Enjoy!

Here Comes the Sun, George Harrison Guitar Tabs Letter Sized PDF

Here Comes the Sun, George Harrison Guitar Tabs Tabloid Sized PDF

Here Comes the Sun, George Harrison Ukulele Tabs Letter Sized PDF

Here Comes the Sun, George Harrison Ukulele Tabs Tabloid Sized PDF

If the letter size tabs (8.5″ x 11″) are too small for your eyes, you can either enlarge to tabloid size (11″ x 17″) using an automatic enlarge feature on many photocopiers, or download the tabloid sized versions for printing. The tabloid size tabs can be inserted into a typical letter sized binder on the 11″ size, and folded almost in half to fit. You just open each tab to use it.

Please click here for guitar and ukulele tabs and chords to other songs on this blog.

Flesch-Kincaid Grade Reading Level: 6.4

This is a gorgeous doo wop song from the 1950s which would obviously have to get severely trimmed down if you’re going to perform it solo with one guitar or ukulele instead of having a band and 3 back up singers.

The Five Satins

But that’s where arrangement comes in.

In the tabbed versions here, you actually do sing some of the accompanying parts when the lead singer is not singing. It’s about as complete a piece as you can do solo.

I’ve also simplified a few phrases ever so slightly, taking out a few subtle melismas (singing of a single syllable while moving between different notes) that are rather hard to do. Finally, I left out that stunning ending vocal interlude the lead singer, Fred Parris, does at the end. If you can do that, you shouldn’t be surfing this site for your music.

The notes are all written out in the tabs (by note letter) to help you figure out how to play my version of the tab.

Now, all that said of playing solo, if you had a group of people, you can certainly train them to sing the back up parts. That would be the “shoh doh shoh be doh” part throughout. This would be a great ukulele group piece, for example, if you put the time in to learn it!

In the Still of the Night, 5 Satins Guitar Tabs Letter Sized PDF

In the Still of the Night, 5 Satins Guitar Tabs Tabloid Sized PDF

In the Still of the Night, 5 Satins Ukulele Tabs Letter Sized PDF

In the Still of the Night, 5 Satins Ukulele Tabs Tabloid Sized PDF

If the letter size tabs (8.5″ x 11″) are too small for your eyes, you can either enlarge to tabloid size (11″ x 17″) using an automatic enlarge feature on many photocopiers, or download the tabloid sized versions for printing. The tabloid size tabs can be inserted into a typical letter sized binder on the 11″ size, and folded almost in half to fit. You just open each tab to use it.

Please click here for guitar and ukulele tabs and chords to other songs on this blog.

By the way, the video was from the 1950s and is quite sad if you realized segregation was in full tilt back then. The white people loved these guys’ music, but treated them worse than they treated their pets. They forced them in the back door, drink from different fountains, probably dressed outside, etc. No wonder they don’t look very happy.

Flesch-Kincaid Grade Reading Level: 7.4

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